Where the jobs are: Five key sectors for workforce development

Where the jobs are: Five key sectors for workforce development

Articles Blog


[Nicole Goldin] There is an ongoing global challenge of
youth unemployment, where young people are struggling to enter the workforce.
While skills training is part of solving this crisis, we also need to understand
where there is private sector demand for jobs and what competencies are needed
particularly for low to middle-skilled youth. Here are five dynamic industries
of opportunity. The first is sustainable tourism and hospitality, which includes
jobs within hotels, in food and beverage, as well as site development, attraction
management or cultural preservation. One in ten new jobs are in the tourism and
hospitality sector. Under the USAID Local Enterprise Support project in Jordan, FHI 360 helped expand livelihood opportunities within additional adventure and heritage sites. This industry provides many welcoming entry-level positions that are suitable for low to middle-skilled youth while still
putting them in a career path to grow and advance. Another industry with employment
potential is the care economy. This includes healthcare, childcare or eldercare. Jobs in this industry are less likely to be automated in the near
future, as they require human interaction. It is also an industry that particularly
engages young women. Creative industries, such as fashion, design, handicraft, music and film also garners interest and excitement from today’s youth. Technology opens up space and provides a platform, while globalization opens up markets for
cross-cultural exchange and trade, meeting demand from societies for
authentic products. In this industry FHI 360 has supported women artisans and
entrepreneurs in Afghanistan and Tunisia by building up their skill sets. A fourth
industry with a huge need is WASH: water, sanitation and hygiene, which is at the
intersection of public health. This industry includes jobs from sewage
supply chains to waste management. There is ongoing demand in lower-income
countries and in rapidly urbanizing areas. Some of these skill sets are also
transferable to other industries, such as construction and logistics, which are
both emerging markets on their own. Finally, we have the ICT or digital
sector. Now this is really a cross-cutting area and a growing
responsibility within the other sectors. It also provides opportunities in and of
itself with digital financial services, coding, e-commerce or platform-based work. Digital work can be more inclusive for youth who may be marginalised for the
workplace, such as people with disabilities, people who are displaced or
young women working from home. Now these five sectors don’t exist in silos. For example, within the creative industries, handywork intersects with the tourism
sector and music, photography and the arts might intersect with ICT or the
digital sector. So it’s really important to look at these holistically for
workforce development. These industries not only create job opportunities but
also job creators and entrepreneurs.

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