Exploring a Career Pathway Embedded with 21st Century Skills at the Elementary Level

Exploring a Career Pathway Embedded with 21st Century Skills at the Elementary Level

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♪[theme music]>>Ms. Castro: The career pathway
that we explored for this lesson was public safety, and we thought
we would just take the idea of um police officer or something
within law enforcement. We know that San Bernardino High School has this
pathway, so we want our kids to know they don’t have to attend just the high
school that’s in our boundaries but they can go to another high school
and that they would be excited to do something with public safety.>>Ms. Hill: the students
got hooked on this theme prior to school even starting. We had
crime scene tape out in front of the room. We had the crime
scene investigation truck out in the front.
There was a police officer in full uniform standing
in the room, so right when we got the students they came
through the crime scene and they-they see this man standing there where there’s
a real live crime had happened. My laptop was stolen from
the Friday that we left all the way through the holiday weekend
something happened to it. I left it at school. We trashed the desk and the students walked into that and they believed it
was real until the press conference.>>Lt. Lawhead: You guys have
all been chosen because you show the you have an ability
to help us out. You are gonna tell me and help me. I don’t have any
officers available right now. Um as you know this, you live in
this city – it’s a very busy city. We have police officers busy everywhere.
So what we’re gonna do is…the laptop was here on this desk when it was last seen, and obviously
it looks like somebody’s been in here. I brought one of my ID Techs.
Her name is Rhonda.>>Ms. Hill: It was very important to have the
lieutenant from the police department as well as his ID Tech so the students
could see what the possibilities are out there.
>>Rhonda: I would take pictures showing all areas of it to show the condition of it
that I found it. And then I’ll do closer pictures of the actual scene
and the areas of interest like showing that this is ransacked. Like show that the laptop is missing here.>>Ms. Castro: So once we explained
to them their job – what the lieutenant was doing
here and he spoke with them, then I think they really got hooked into
the idea that they had a job to do and a problem to solve and that they
were responsible for that. And when you put responsibility on the students, and your expectations are high they all
rise to meet it. The students that have trouble with discipline and
tend to be disruptive in class, we had zero discipline problems this
week because they were constantly engaged, and I think they
felt they were responsible in their group to help each other – that
no one had to do this by themselves. And they understood that they
were tasked with something serious, and they really rose to the
occasion. And I think just setting the scenario and engaging them
and hooking them right away, that set the tone for the whole entire
week and they really rose to the occasion.>>Ms. Hill: Once the students had
logged all of their photograph um pieces of evidence and every
evidence that they had or are all the evidence that they had collected, the
students actually read a scenario that described the-the prior
day’s to the crime happening.>>Ms. Hill: We wanted them to
look at all the information and then do a sequence
of events – a time line. And in that time line they had to refer to 5
different sources from different schedules from office staff to
um custodian staff, who has the key to the
room, video information, daily schedules, so they can compile all
that information to deduce what happened and to come up with this time line or sequence
of events to understand when the crime could have occurred.>>student 1: I put Mr. A came in
at 4:25 then asked a question.>>Ms. Hill: On the third day
in the afternoon we created questions to interview our suspects.
Prior to the kids actually asking the suspects we also
wanted to kind of talk about body language and how you can read that, and
kind of know what a person- what they’re thinking and feeling inside
just by observation, pure observation. This is a defense like mechanism that we
just have. It’s just nature to do this. You might do something with your hand. Thank
you for raising your hand. Kajay?>>Kajay: Or you might do what you
did earlier – curl your hair.>>Ms. Hill: Okay, uh…play with hair is one.>>student [off camera]: But a lot of people wouldn’t do that.>>Ms. Hill: Yeah but it depends on the person. For me if I’m nervous, then I do…I play
with my hair and I don’t know if anybody else does.
>>students [off camera] I do. I play with my hair.>>Ms. Castro: The part of questioning the
suspects involved a lot of communication because it was verbal and nonverbal. So
not only were they listening to what the suspects were saying and writing down
the information, they were having to infer and deduce what they were saying.
Is this a lie or is this the truth? Does this makes sense with the evidence that I have?
Or this completely out of character for the person? Does
it match anything that we have found, so they had to communicate not only with
the suspect then once again with each other and again justify
and provide evidence that this is why we’re choosing this person based
on what they’ve said and what we found to be true.>>student: What shoes do you
normally where with your jeans?>>Principal Rainbolt: When I wear jeans… Um, well it depends. If I’m at work and I’m
wearing jeans and I have like a dress shirt on I’ll still wear…these shoes-same
shoes I wear every other day to work.>>student: No, like blue jeans?
>>Principal Rainbolt: Yeah, Sometimes I wear blue jeans to work if it’s a-a day where I’m-uh
doing things that are more physical.>>student: Okay. Um, you know how
you say you have tennis shoes. Right?>>Principal Rainbolt: Yeah, I have tennis shoes.>>student: And… I was wondering um… what kind do you have?>>Principal Rainbolt: Sketchers>>student: Okay, that will be it for me.
>>Principal Rainbolt: Okay, thank you.>>student 1: Look at Mr. Major’s. Look how
in the middle, how right here, it doesn’t go all the way through because you
can see a line through there.>>student 2: But in this one, it has this.
>>student 3: Yeah, and it doesn’t have that.>>student 1: He may have been
wearing different shoes.>>student 2: We should have asked,
how many pairs of shoes do you have?>>student 3: No, like, what
kind of shoes to you have. Or we should have asked and
showed him a picture like this.>>student 2: Um, does it match the
bottom of these…but we didn’t!>>Ms. Hill: The students actually
had to create a narrative based off of all of the evidence
and as well as the scenario, and just everything that they had seen
since they entered the crime scene. We had started this prior to the
lieutenant coming in and then when the lieutenant got there he
actually got into our room he read our students’ police reports and started
asking them other leading questions.>>Lt. Lawhead: Let’s start with
what we talked about over there and then we will kinda go down.
What kind of-what kind of evidence do you have? You-you’ve just
mentioned some stuff that was circumstantial stuff.
>>student 3: We have a shoe print size 11 tennis shoe, a diet
coke bottle with fingerprints, open mint case with fingerprints also.
South side-oh we didn’t write…>>student 1: I wrote down some stuff.>>Lt. Lawhead: And-and do you think-you
think that-you think the fingerprint are a good comparison?
>>student 1: Two of them matched.>>Lt. Lawhead: Two of them matched him?
And were they… You-you gotta figure since he’s a janitor,
he’s in here all the time. Right?>>students: Yeah>>Lt. Lawhead: So would he leave his fingerprints
normally in this room if…>>student 2: Yeah.>>Lt. Lawhead: Is that something that would happen on a
regular basis?>>students: Yeah.>>student 1: Welcome to the
Bing Wong CSI Press conference. On Tuesday
January 20, 2015 at approximately 08:57
hours we arrived at 1250 East-East 9th Street
San Bernardino, California 92410 in E-100.>>Ms. Castro: So on the last day, it was
kind of the culminating day of our projects So the students had decided
who their main suspect was, it was our principal, Mr.
Rainbolt. We brought back all of the suspects and
they were seated in our press conference.>>Ms. Hill: And the students read their police
report, their press release and actually said…all the-the entire scenario, everything that happened from beginning to
end. And they actually named their suspect>>student 1: Based on the evidence
that was gathered, we believe that on Monday, January 19, 2015 at approximately 15:40 hours, Mr. Rainbolt, principal at Bing
Wong Elementary School, entered room E-100 and stole Miss
Hill’s Apple MacBook Pro.>>audience: Ooooohh
>>student 1: Thank you for your time, The CSI Forensics Team from
Bing Wong Elementary School.>>Ms. Hill: We decided to take the students
on a field trip to the police station so they could see, first hand, what
Lt. Lawhead and Officer Rhonda did on a daily basis, as well as all the
different parts and jobs that-that involve public safety.>>Ms. Castro: I think it’s
important because they got to see officers again in real
life away from school; they’re off-campus and to see that this
exists within their city that they live. And it was a positive experience.
They might have already come across police officers in a negative way, and
this was something they could say I could do this. I can work here,
it’s not that far from my house. This is a positive thing. To see the SWAT truck and to go into the
SWAT vehicle and touch things and listen to detectives, and be an interrogation room,
I think they will never forget this lesson because this was a real life thing. And I think you should have some kind of
culminating activity at the end of each theme to keep the kids interested.
Plus to let them see real-life adults doing this job and not
just hear it from their teacher or see a video. They need to be there
and they need to be immersed in that pathway.>>Ms. Hill: Throughout their entire
experience the students were engaged and they didn’t give up. Things didn’t get
easier, they got harder. So then we are we started incorporating
all the critical thinking, and collaboration, communication, and the creativity
from the very very beginning. So the objective was to inspire, but in the end we ended up covering
about sixteen standards for 6th grade, as well as all the 21st
Century Learning Skills.>>student 3: It is him ’cause look, look.
Out of the thing ’cause it has another…>>student 5: Wait, he has his foot is upside down.>>student 2: We can’t pick the wrong person. ♪[theme music]

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